Our Greatest Successes/Failures on the Allotment of 2016

Success/Failures
Growblogs Plot

Success/Failures 2016

A look back over our success/failures on our allotment in 2016. Having good success in the garden is what keeps us interested. Fueling our desires to return each year to expand and improve. Failure is the catalyst that makes us more determined, to work harder and smarter. Each growing season is unique. So here we are going to show you our 3 greatest successes and failures of 2016.

Successes

  1. The first big success and new key part of our plot, is the new greenhouse. Last year we used it to grow crops, as we were behind schedule on construction. But next season it will be mainly used for seed germination, and early 2017 we will be constructing shelving and a seed sowing area. Check out our previous posts, about how we constructed the greenhouse from, base construction to glazing. Garden Structure/Greenhouse Base – How to do it yourself DIY Greenhouse Construction, Proper Job !

    success/failures
    Next years seed house
  2. Our second big success of the year I would say is our blog. While we are not snowed under with subscribers, we have been working hard to improve the content of our posts. We also try and deliver content, that people want to see and will find useful. We have also been learning the tech skills to make the blog more available to people that might find it interesting. While at the same time meeting and making friends some very helpful and informative individuals through social media. http://www.facebook.com/growblogs http://www.twitter.com/growblogs
  3. Our third big success of the year would have to be some of the wonderful crops and produce that we have been producing throughout the year. 2016 has very much been a year of firsts. Some crops we were growing for the first time, with great success. Out top 3 new vegetables that we grew this year were Kohlrabi Kohlrabi & Kohlrabi coleslaw recipe , Sweet romano Peppers   and White Cauliflower.
    success/failures
    White Cauliflower

     

    These three are all great tasting and versatile crops. 

The cauliflower could have ended up on either success/failures list.  After an absence from the plot for a fortnight. I was pleasantly surprised to see that, the critters has left me the biggest and best-looking cauliflower on the plot. Another veg to cross off my ever decreasing, to grow and eat list.

When it comes to success and failures,no matter what there is much to be learned. We at growblogs had a motto even before we seen our plot for the first time. To learn from doing, and learn from our success/failures. Getting stuck in and having a go is wild craic. If it all goes wrong ? Sure you can try again next year.

Failures

  1. Outsmarting the critters. Once again we waged war on every manner of beast, all shapes and size, determined to devour our crops. We built, protective nets, cages and kept a strict bug picking diary. But yet the came, and they ate and what they didnt eat they pooped on.

    success/failures
    Damm Caterpillars
  2. Basically, it  took us much longer to build the greenhouse than it should. I bought the greenhouse frame in a water damaged sale. The greenhouse frame itself is obviously waterproof, that’s why I bought it. I’m smart like that. The instructions for the greenhouse frame, however, were not waterproof and had disintegrated. The crops we had been growing, for eventual transport into the greenhouse, were growing bigger and bigger and starting to fruit by the time they were ready to move. Whilst it was a relief to get the plants out of  my cramped flat, they took a bit of a battering and some had to be shortened for transport. Some of these plants, mainly the tomato plants never fully recovered.

    success/failures
    Tomatoes “Gardeners delight”
  3. Disease. This will probably be on our list every year. Early in the summer conditions were perfect for blight, and we link all the plots on our allotment, suffered. Our potato crops held up pretty well, but we lost all of our outdoor tomatoes and peppers. Some signs did show inside the greenhouse but we were quick to remove those infected plants to stem spreading the blight. Later nearing the end of summer our cucurbits suffered badly from an attack of  powdery mildew. This while didn’t massively affect the produce that was well established and producing. But with the early destruction of the leaves it certainly stunted growth, and shortened the season. 

    success/failures
    powdery mildew

Next year were sure everything is going to go swimmingly. 

 

 

December Allotment 2016 – Jobs we will be getting on with.

December Allotment 2016
Chris looking smug with his carrots.

December Allotment 2016

December allotment diary 2016… and its going to be a quiet  month for growblogs. We are both normally very busy preparing  for the Christmas rush in work. Evenings start in the afternoons generally pitch black by 4pm now. So, apart from a few fleeting visits to harvest some of our hardier vegetables, and to replenish the bird feeders, the December Allotment 2016 Pages are going to be pretty bare. That is up until the end of the month at least.

This doesn’t  mean that we haven’t been planning tho, the end of December I will have a full week of work off, and intend to make the most of it up at the allotment. I started a low fence along the front of our plot a few months back. The reason it is so low is that the sun crosses along the front, and we wanted to allow for maximum sunlight. I dug holes and positioned the posts to the edge of our boundary and fixed with postcrete. I will be digging a trench an under pinning the chicken wire fence beneath the ground to deter any burrowing creatures.

december allotment
Next years seed house

The second job will be to securely fix the greenhouse, to the greenhouse base that I installed in the summer. With the weight of the PVC paneling that we used to glaze the greenhouse, currently holding the frame in position. I didnt fancy taking the risk that a possible high wind might cause some damage. So i will drill the bottom of the frame and use plugs, screws, and washers to securely fix the frame to the concrete slab base.

Should I Cover Raised Beds Or Leave to the Elements OverWinter ?

Ive been asked a few  times since the growing season has slowed to a freeze, are you better to cover your raised beds to deter sunlight and starve the weeds. Or are you better to leave the beds to the elements and let the frost penetrate the ground,  and kill off anything that is still growing. On our plot we have two identical size beds which were made at the same time, so we have decided to cover one with a thick black builders pvc, and the other we have left to the elements. Come February or March when we come to work the ground again, we shall show which we think worked  best. 

December Allotment 2016
Bird feed

 

Our Allotment Wishlist for Santa

Dear Santa Claus

Connor and Myself have been really good boys all year. We hope you and the missus and all your reindeer’s are keeping well. We would please like the following if not too much to ask. A 6x3m polytunnel with a window, loads of sunshine and it would be just dandy if you could do something about the mares tail please.

All the best 

The lads at growblogs