Allotment Construction

Allotment Construction

allotment construction
New raised Beds

We may have been quiet on the blog front but we have been busy concentrating on allotment construction. Its defiantly been more of a fence post, than a blog post last few months. A month or so Connor said something very profound during one of our many coffee breaks.

“Wont it be really nice when we can just come up here and plant a few things and relax” and for once he was right.

Allotment construction
Chris skiving in the shed

So we decided for one big push to finish all of our allotment construction projects. Hail, rain and shine we have had the lot. But it didn’t stop us and we played a blinder.

Due to the slope of our plot raised beds helps us keep our land from washing away and allows us to create level paths. The only bare ground left is where we grew our last season potatoes and some late kale and brassicas. The ground is generally good, and has been turned well by the potato roots. The top bed is heavy with sand so we removed a couple of wheelbarrows and topped up the carrot water container. Carrots are font of sandy ground and we replaced the earth with some multi-purpose compost and manure to the top bed. For the top beds we used decking boards, as they are a good depth, and are pretreated to survive the rain and damp conditions. The reason one is shorter is to allow us to push a wheelbarrow throughout the plot.

allotment construction

Sowing Seeds

We have been busy sowing seeds and getting ready for the final frosts to lift. We erected a few mini greenhouses within our main greenhouse. This is allowing us to reach temperatures, suitable enough for heat-loving seedlings such as chilies and tomatoes. So far it is working well and we are starting some of the more heartier veg such as cabbage and onions within the main greenhouse. http://growblogs.com/sowing-seeds-indoors/

allotment construction
Propagation Station

Poly-tunnel

We finally made a decision and purchased the poly-tunnel. We decided to stick with a 3m x 6m and have started to level ground. The ground underneath has been covered with black PVC since last autumn and was dug and turned to allow the frost to penetrate. We have been busy researching the best tips and tricks to erecting a polytunnel and will be hopefully showing our results soon. When the polytunnel is erected that is all the major allotment construction complete. Well.. until I get a new idea or project. 

Spuds

Its also time to get our spuds in the ground and off my windowsill. This season were planting http://growblogs.com/potatoes/

  • First earlies – Red Duke Of York

  • Second earlies – Kestrel

  • Main Crop – King Edward

  • Main Crop – Maris Piper

So in a few months get ready for more photos of us with our feet up and hopefully a few homegrown cocktail recipes.

allotment construction
Onion Sets

December Allotment 2016 – Jobs we will be getting on with.

December Allotment 2016
Chris looking smug with his carrots.

December Allotment 2016

December allotment diary 2016… and its going to be a quiet  month for growblogs. We are both normally very busy preparing  for the Christmas rush in work. Evenings start in the afternoons generally pitch black by 4pm now. So, apart from a few fleeting visits to harvest some of our hardier vegetables, and to replenish the bird feeders, the December Allotment 2016 Pages are going to be pretty bare. That is up until the end of the month at least.

This doesn’t  mean that we haven’t been planning tho, the end of December I will have a full week of work off, and intend to make the most of it up at the allotment. I started a low fence along the front of our plot a few months back. The reason it is so low is that the sun crosses along the front, and we wanted to allow for maximum sunlight. I dug holes and positioned the posts to the edge of our boundary and fixed with postcrete. I will be digging a trench an under pinning the chicken wire fence beneath the ground to deter any burrowing creatures.

december allotment
Next years seed house

The second job will be to securely fix the greenhouse, to the greenhouse base that I installed in the summer. With the weight of the PVC paneling that we used to glaze the greenhouse, currently holding the frame in position. I didnt fancy taking the risk that a possible high wind might cause some damage. So i will drill the bottom of the frame and use plugs, screws, and washers to securely fix the frame to the concrete slab base.

Should I Cover Raised Beds Or Leave to the Elements OverWinter ?

Ive been asked a few  times since the growing season has slowed to a freeze, are you better to cover your raised beds to deter sunlight and starve the weeds. Or are you better to leave the beds to the elements and let the frost penetrate the ground,  and kill off anything that is still growing. On our plot we have two identical size beds which were made at the same time, so we have decided to cover one with a thick black builders pvc, and the other we have left to the elements. Come February or March when we come to work the ground again, we shall show which we think worked  best. 

December Allotment 2016
Bird feed

 

Our Allotment Wishlist for Santa

Dear Santa Claus

Connor and Myself have been really good boys all year. We hope you and the missus and all your reindeer’s are keeping well. We would please like the following if not too much to ask. A 6x3m polytunnel with a window, loads of sunshine and it would be just dandy if you could do something about the mares tail please.

All the best 

The lads at growblogs

Booze – Learning The Ways & Home Made Apple Press

We at Growblogs love our booze (in moderation, most of the time), and from the very start one of our main goals was to grow and produce our own booze. Ive always fancied the idea of homebrew, experimenting with flavours and techniques to make different wines, ciders and ales, so when I start a new project, I do what I always do and buy a good book and start reading. I already collect the River Cottage Handbook series, so the addition of the booze edition was a must. It is written by John Wright, who you will probably know from the River Cottage Series, as the foraging guy who makes booze from things he finds in hedges, and Hughs rosey red cheeked drinking buddy. They always seem to be sloshed and having a laugh so I know I will be getting good advice.

booze, apple press

With an ample supply of free apples this time of year, we decided to start by making cider. I purchased a home brewing kit with all the accessories needed as well as a couple of demi-Johns to store the cider in. I organised and collected some crab apples from my parents garden. Then when I sat down to read the process, I stumbled at the first block with the lack of an apple press. After a quick google I soon realised that a decent cheap one would cost around £70 and would take 2 weeks to deliver. I did not want to be spending that sort of money on something that would get used so little, so after more googling, I found that making my own was the way to go. Our booze filled plans are back on track.

booze, apple press

An apple press is a machine used to separate the juice from the rest of the fruit through the exertion of pressure on apple pulp. There are many different variations of this design online, I decided to use a bottle jack because I had one in the shed and barely used it.

booze, apple press

The buckets that we purchased are known as plasterers buckets, they are tougher than normal buckets and hold a much larger quantity. We drilled holes in the bucket to allow the juiced to drop down into the vessel below. We recommend using a wood drill bit when boring holes in plastic as it is less likely to crack the bucket and lives a nice round clean hole.

booze, apple press

The timber frame needs to be strong, we used 3” x 1 ½ “ rough timber, and bolted and screwed the pieces together to make sure that it will take the pressure of the 1 ton jack.

There are much more detailed plans to make something similar to this online if your not the most DIY minded, but I think its pretty straight forward. Hopefully this weekend will provide us with good weather and the opportunity to test it out.

booze, apple press

Garden Structure/Greenhouse Base – How to do it yourself DIY

2016-04-16 14.53.26
Greenhouse Base

Greenhouse Base

Every good structure is preceded by a good solid base or foundation. When it came to choosing a material to use as the greenhouse base, it was obvious that paving slabs would be the best choice. Due to the location and nature of the build, paving slabs will be the quickest and most convenient method for us to use, while still providing us with a semi permanent solid foundation. If I had been building the greenhouse on my own land I would bed the slabs on concrete, but as I will be growing vegetables within the vicinity, and because I may want to move the greenhouse in the future (were only on our second full season), I decided to lay the slabs on a bed of quarry dust. When laid correctly, leveled and maintained, a well pointed paving slab area will provide a strong and weather proof base for many garden structures including shed bases, greenhouses bases or just a seating area.

Before I tell you how I laid the slabs there is a few important safety shout outs I must give.

First and foremost paving slabs are very heavy. Anything above a 2′ x 2′ paving slab is a 2 man lift. Gloves and steel toe cap boots are essential and if you need to cut the slabs, then you will need eye protection, ear defenders and a dust mask. When it comes to cutting slabs, the only viable method is to use an angle grinder/ Stihl saw with a concrete cutting or diamond tipped blade. If you are not confident or 100% competent, using either of these tools then you are better leaving it to someone who is. These are very dangerous tools if used incorrectly or in the wrong hands.

Tools you will need for the job.

  • Spade – for digging down to level the ground, also helpful to open the bags and spread the quarry dust.
  • Rubber Mallet – This is good for compressing the slabs into the bed of dust and to level off corners without damaging the face of the slab.
  • Spirit Level – This is essential to level off the dust to get a consistent level plane, to lay the slabs on. It is also a good tool to drag the dust back, and to use as a tamper to even out the dust.

When it comes to leveling the dust off, I use the edge of a large spirit level and level each side first to a desired height. This means that as long as either side is level, I just need to keep the dust up and flush with the bottom of the spirit level. 2016-04-16 11.38.42

Its important to remember when laying a slab beside another slab, not to get your finger trapped between both edges. When the slabs are laid firmly on the dust you should be able to walk on them, without the slabs rocking back and forth. If you need to open or adjust the spacing’s simply stand on the slab you don’t want to move and use a spade to lever the opposite slab into position.

greenhouse base
Level Greenhouse Base
Greenhouse Base
Laying dust level to set the greenhouse base slabs onto

I am still trying to decide what I am going to do about the spacing’s. The obvious option is to use concrete and point them, but im trying my best to refrain from using any concrete products on my plot. If you have any suggestions of what I should use, please send me an email or contact us on Facebook.