December Allotment 2016 – Jobs we will be getting on with.

December Allotment 2016
Chris looking smug with his carrots.

December Allotment 2016

December allotment diary 2016… and its going to be a quiet  month for growblogs. We are both normally very busy preparing  for the Christmas rush in work. Evenings start in the afternoons generally pitch black by 4pm now. So, apart from a few fleeting visits to harvest some of our hardier vegetables, and to replenish the bird feeders, the December Allotment 2016 Pages are going to be pretty bare. That is up until the end of the month at least.

This doesn’t  mean that we haven’t been planning tho, the end of December I will have a full week of work off, and intend to make the most of it up at the allotment. I started a low fence along the front of our plot a few months back. The reason it is so low is that the sun crosses along the front, and we wanted to allow for maximum sunlight. I dug holes and positioned the posts to the edge of our boundary and fixed with postcrete. I will be digging a trench an under pinning the chicken wire fence beneath the ground to deter any burrowing creatures.

december allotment
Next years seed house

The second job will be to securely fix the greenhouse, to the greenhouse base that I installed in the summer. With the weight of the PVC paneling that we used to glaze the greenhouse, currently holding the frame in position. I didnt fancy taking the risk that a possible high wind might cause some damage. So i will drill the bottom of the frame and use plugs, screws, and washers to securely fix the frame to the concrete slab base.

Should I Cover Raised Beds Or Leave to the Elements OverWinter ?

Ive been asked a few  times since the growing season has slowed to a freeze, are you better to cover your raised beds to deter sunlight and starve the weeds. Or are you better to leave the beds to the elements and let the frost penetrate the ground,  and kill off anything that is still growing. On our plot we have two identical size beds which were made at the same time, so we have decided to cover one with a thick black builders pvc, and the other we have left to the elements. Come February or March when we come to work the ground again, we shall show which we think worked  best. 

December Allotment 2016
Bird feed

 

Our Allotment Wishlist for Santa

Dear Santa Claus

Connor and Myself have been really good boys all year. We hope you and the missus and all your reindeer’s are keeping well. We would please like the following if not too much to ask. A 6x3m polytunnel with a window, loads of sunshine and it would be just dandy if you could do something about the mares tail please.

All the best 

The lads at growblogs

Garden Structure/Greenhouse Base – How to do it yourself DIY

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Greenhouse Base

Greenhouse Base

Every good structure is preceded by a good solid base or foundation. When it came to choosing a material to use as the greenhouse base, it was obvious that paving slabs would be the best choice. Due to the location and nature of the build, paving slabs will be the quickest and most convenient method for us to use, while still providing us with a semi permanent solid foundation. If I had been building the greenhouse on my own land I would bed the slabs on concrete, but as I will be growing vegetables within the vicinity, and because I may want to move the greenhouse in the future (were only on our second full season), I decided to lay the slabs on a bed of quarry dust. When laid correctly, leveled and maintained, a well pointed paving slab area will provide a strong and weather proof base for many garden structures including shed bases, greenhouses bases or just a seating area.

Before I tell you how I laid the slabs there is a few important safety shout outs I must give.

First and foremost paving slabs are very heavy. Anything above a 2′ x 2′ paving slab is a 2 man lift. Gloves and steel toe cap boots are essential and if you need to cut the slabs, then you will need eye protection, ear defenders and a dust mask. When it comes to cutting slabs, the only viable method is to use an angle grinder/ Stihl saw with a concrete cutting or diamond tipped blade. If you are not confident or 100% competent, using either of these tools then you are better leaving it to someone who is. These are very dangerous tools if used incorrectly or in the wrong hands.

Tools you will need for the job.

  • Spade – for digging down to level the ground, also helpful to open the bags and spread the quarry dust.
  • Rubber Mallet – This is good for compressing the slabs into the bed of dust and to level off corners without damaging the face of the slab.
  • Spirit Level – This is essential to level off the dust to get a consistent level plane, to lay the slabs on. It is also a good tool to drag the dust back, and to use as a tamper to even out the dust.

When it comes to leveling the dust off, I use the edge of a large spirit level and level each side first to a desired height. This means that as long as either side is level, I just need to keep the dust up and flush with the bottom of the spirit level. 2016-04-16 11.38.42

Its important to remember when laying a slab beside another slab, not to get your finger trapped between both edges. When the slabs are laid firmly on the dust you should be able to walk on them, without the slabs rocking back and forth. If you need to open or adjust the spacing’s simply stand on the slab you don’t want to move and use a spade to lever the opposite slab into position.

greenhouse base
Level Greenhouse Base
Greenhouse Base
Laying dust level to set the greenhouse base slabs onto

I am still trying to decide what I am going to do about the spacing’s. The obvious option is to use concrete and point them, but im trying my best to refrain from using any concrete products on my plot. If you have any suggestions of what I should use, please send me an email or contact us on Facebook.