Fall – Daylight Saving Time, Making The Most Of Your Time

Jack Be Littles

Fall is a wonderful time of year, with the trees turning every shade of orange, brown and reds. The days are rapidly shortening, and finding time to work at the allotment with adequate daylight is rapidly declining. With the arrival of the Fall, often due to the changes in the weather, much less time is needed to tend to the diminishing crops. I like to use the spare time to maintain my builds, work on future projects and tend to and feed my various compost bins. When up keeping an allotment this time of year, it is important to use your time away from the plot, planning ahead and gather resources when and where it is possible, so that you can make the most of your time on the plot.

While the term fall is now more associated as the American term for Autumn, it originated in England. The term fall, is short for the falling of the leaves, which happens annually at this time of year. This year we are making a concerned effort to store as much of these fallen leaves as possible as, when composted turn to leaf mould, which is the perfect ingredient to use as mulch. Builders sacks are perfect for storing leaves long enough to turn to mulch, and can often be obtained by asking a friendly builder or builders merchants. Last year one of biggest expenditures was the buying in of good quality compost and mulch, and with it being one of the few things used for gardening that you can make yourself, it was utmost that we master this skill pronto.

Pumpkin bed ready for winter.

With the last of our crop of miniature “Jack be Little” pumpkins harvested in time for Halloween, it meant that we could finally clear the bed and burn the discarded plants as they were suffering from powdery mildew. Once all the weeds and green materials are removed from the bed, I gave it a quick turn over and covered the bed with a thick polythene sheet, and weighed down to stop them taking off in the winter winds.

I then used the rest of the polythene to line the water tank that I recently salvaged from work, making sure to pierce the bottom of the liner multiple times to allow for suitable drainage. I intend to grow carrots and parsnips in this container next year, due to the depth it holds. Therefor I will eventually fill the container with a sandy loam mix, which will allow the root vegetables to grow long and straight.


The sole survivors left in the greenhouse and continuing to provide me with sweet, and great tasting produce are the long sweet peppers. With the last of the tomatoes making no attempt to ripen I decided to clear them out of the greenhouse and chopped them up into small pieces and added to my increasing compost pile. I did a bit of a clear out of my filing systems back home and shredded the lot as the compost heaps needed a topping up of brown material, after the recent influx of green waste. When the greenhouse is completely clear we are going to secure the frame firmly to the greenhouse base, in preparation for winter. This will also give me a chance to start designing and planning the layout for turning the greenhouse into a potting shed/ greenhouse.

Last of the greenhouse produce.

Happy Halloween Growfans


Booze – Learning The Ways & Home Made Apple Press

We at Growblogs love our booze (in moderation, most of the time), and from the very start one of our main goals was to grow and produce our own booze. Ive always fancied the idea of homebrew, experimenting with flavours and techniques to make different wines, ciders and ales, so when I start a new project, I do what I always do and buy a good book and start reading. I already collect the River Cottage Handbook series, so the addition of the booze edition was a must. It is written by John Wright, who you will probably know from the River Cottage Series, as the foraging guy who makes booze from things he finds in hedges, and Hughs rosey red cheeked drinking buddy. They always seem to be sloshed and having a laugh so I know I will be getting good advice.

booze, apple press

With an ample supply of free apples this time of year, we decided to start by making cider. I purchased a home brewing kit with all the accessories needed as well as a couple of demi-Johns to store the cider in. I organised and collected some crab apples from my parents garden. Then when I sat down to read the process, I stumbled at the first block with the lack of an apple press. After a quick google I soon realised that a decent cheap one would cost around £70 and would take 2 weeks to deliver. I did not want to be spending that sort of money on something that would get used so little, so after more googling, I found that making my own was the way to go. Our booze filled plans are back on track.

booze, apple press

An apple press is a machine used to separate the juice from the rest of the fruit through the exertion of pressure on apple pulp. There are many different variations of this design online, I decided to use a bottle jack because I had one in the shed and barely used it.

booze, apple press

The buckets that we purchased are known as plasterers buckets, they are tougher than normal buckets and hold a much larger quantity. We drilled holes in the bucket to allow the juiced to drop down into the vessel below. We recommend using a wood drill bit when boring holes in plastic as it is less likely to crack the bucket and lives a nice round clean hole.

booze, apple press

The timber frame needs to be strong, we used 3” x 1 ½ “ rough timber, and bolted and screwed the pieces together to make sure that it will take the pressure of the 1 ton jack.

There are much more detailed plans to make something similar to this online if your not the most DIY minded, but I think its pretty straight forward. Hopefully this weekend will provide us with good weather and the opportunity to test it out.

booze, apple press

Winter Wildlife – A little help goes a long way.

Winter Wildlife

winter wildlife
Bird Feed

There’s no doubt about it there’s a nip in the air, and the media are scaring us with tales that the winter could be much worse than 2010. This means only one thing, time to tuck the plot in for the winter while trying to make it a haven for our wild animals this winter. That snug feeling of being tucked up in your superman onesie in front of an open fire (chestnuts roasting ob.), can feel even more content knowing you have done your bit for winter wildlife. If your cold and hungry imaging how that little robin at the end of your garden feels.

There are many activities you can undertake from the very simplest through to some that will take time and some expense. One of the simplest and most rewarding you can do is simply put feed out for birds. Whether you keep leftover bits of fat from bacon rinds, bread crumbs or go to the expense of purchasing seeds or mealworms you will greatly help out our feathered friends when food sources are scarce. It is also important to remember this much over looked fact, birds drink water ! And when there is snow on the ground or temperatures are below zero then this is not always easily accessible to them.

winter wildlife
Bird Feeders

As the days started to gradually get colder and the growing season started to run out, we started to think about bugs and small animals. There is a great abundance of wildlife up at out allotment (with most of it living in my shed), we are blessed to have seen hares, grey squirrels, all of your common uk birds, frogs and we even arrived one day to chase a small flock of grey lag geese from our neighbours salad patch. We had planted some asian vegetables late end of summer and were unable to harvest it all. Our Choy sum had started to flower and was covered in bees and hover flies. As we weren’t going to have time to gain another crop from this space we decided that it would do the bees a world of good to have that extra source of food so we left it in the ground.


With little to no growing on our plot the focus has mainly turned into maintenaince and improving our structures. We gave the plot a good tidy 2 weeks ago and removed some of the rubbish that was accumulating in one of the corners. There was some offcuts of wood and various logs that were sodden and probbly no good for the fire but we didnt want to disturb them as it was probbly providing home to many wonderful beasts. It can happily sit there until next year when the weather starts to pick up and nature is back to its most energetic.

The simplest things we can do can mean the difference of survival or not for our winter wildlife.