Booze – Learning The Ways & Home Made Apple Press

We at Growblogs love our booze (in moderation, most of the time), and from the very start one of our main goals was to grow and produce our own booze. Ive always fancied the idea of homebrew, experimenting with flavours and techniques to make different wines, ciders and ales, so when I start a new project, I do what I always do and buy a good book and start reading. I already collect the River Cottage Handbook series, so the addition of the booze edition was a must. It is written by John Wright, who you will probably know from the River Cottage Series, as the foraging guy who makes booze from things he finds in hedges, and Hughs rosey red cheeked drinking buddy. They always seem to be sloshed and having a laugh so I know I will be getting good advice.

booze, apple press

With an ample supply of free apples this time of year, we decided to start by making cider. I purchased a home brewing kit with all the accessories needed as well as a couple of demi-Johns to store the cider in. I organised and collected some crab apples from my parents garden. Then when I sat down to read the process, I stumbled at the first block with the lack of an apple press. After a quick google I soon realised that a decent cheap one would cost around £70 and would take 2 weeks to deliver. I did not want to be spending that sort of money on something that would get used so little, so after more googling, I found that making my own was the way to go. Our booze filled plans are back on track.

booze, apple press

An apple press is a machine used to separate the juice from the rest of the fruit through the exertion of pressure on apple pulp. There are many different variations of this design online, I decided to use a bottle jack because I had one in the shed and barely used it.

booze, apple press

The buckets that we purchased are known as plasterers buckets, they are tougher than normal buckets and hold a much larger quantity. We drilled holes in the bucket to allow the juiced to drop down into the vessel below. We recommend using a wood drill bit when boring holes in plastic as it is less likely to crack the bucket and lives a nice round clean hole.

booze, apple press

The timber frame needs to be strong, we used 3” x 1 ½ “ rough timber, and bolted and screwed the pieces together to make sure that it will take the pressure of the 1 ton jack.

There are much more detailed plans to make something similar to this online if your not the most DIY minded, but I think its pretty straight forward. Hopefully this weekend will provide us with good weather and the opportunity to test it out.

booze, apple press

Potatoes

Potatoes

One of if not the most popular vegetable grown and consumed throughout Ireland and the UK. The unofficial National Vegetable of Ireland and the star of dishes stretching from chip vans to fine dining restaurants.

Whilst some people ask “why bother growing potatoes” when they are so readily available and inexpensive. True, they do take up a fair bit of room when planted, but it is possible to grow them, successful in containers and pots. Last year we were only working half the plot so we planted a large crop of spuds as they are really good at breaking up the ground with their roots leaving the ground good for the following years planting. Also growing your own, means that you get to choose what characteristics you want from your potato, either a delicious waxy first early salad potato like the Arran Pilot or a main crop roasting potato like the Golden Wonder or Kerrs Pink.

 

Potatoes
Potato Drills

 

The easiest way to grow your own potatoes is to purchase bags of seed potatoes. These seed potatoes are grown specifically to be virus resistant. Different variety’s of potatoes develop at different stages of the growing season. All of the variety’s of potatoes will go into the ground on the same day, traditionally on St Patricks Day on the emerald isle but this year as it falls on a Thursday it will be the weekend before or after.

First Earlies – On a typical growing season it usually takes around 10 – 12 weeks from planting to harvesting, and often when the plants stop flowering is a good indicator that the crop is ready. Popular UK variety’s of first earlies include Arran Pilot, Pentland Javelin which is what we have chosen to plant this year, or Duke of York which is a great all round new potato.

 

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Pentland javelline

 

Second Earlies – Again on a typical growing season second earlier will usually take between 13 – 15 weeks from planting to harvesting. First and Second early crops grow well in containers or pots and this is the approach we are going for this year as we still have a few structures to go into our plot. It also means that we can move them about when needed and we can try and cram them in every available spot. Popular second early variety’s include, Charlotte which is the variety we have chosen as we had great success with the previous year, Kestrel and Ratte.

 

Charlotte Potatoes
Charlotte Potatoes

 

Maincrops – Maincrop potatoes prefer being grown directly into the ground. They will need more space and the tubers often grow much larger then early variety’s. These are normally ready to harvest around 20 weeks after planting, Some of the more popular variety s include, Maris Piper which we will be purchasing in the near future, King Edward and Desiree.

Chitting – About 5 – 6 weeks before I plan to plant out my spuds im going to start the chitting process. This basically means standing the potatoes on their end with any eyes facing upwards on a tray, or anything that will keep them elevated and dry egg, boxes and seed trays are often used for this purpose. The chitting potatoes need to be left in a dry well lit and cool area, windowsills are ideal. Some people suggest that chitting doesnt benefit the growing process, but were going to do it anyway as nothing says Spring is coming that a windowsill full of seed potatoes.

When we come to planting our own potatoes were going to show you how to prepare the ground and look at some differing techniques for growing your spuds and how to care for them along the way.

Allotment Blog allert – Who are we ??

allotment blog
Growblogs Plot

 

 

Allotment Blog

Hello Im Chris and I say this on behalf of my good friend and allotment buddy Connor, Welcome to our blog !

“Another Allotment Blog !!!” I hear you scream at you devices of choice….. Well yeah but its not just any other allotment blog, its OUR allotment blog.

“Whats the difference between this allotment blog and any other allotment blog” You hark as the veins throb on your tempels” Well the simple answer is…. we’ve got a dinosaur on our logo.

Heres a bit about me. My name is Christopher (Chris, Ging) im 31 years old, my favourite colour is purple and fav animal is an elephant. I work in construction for my fathers building firm, tho I also run my own business as an energy advisor for the domestic housing market. Im a keen fisherman love the outdoors, and love the challenge of turning things I find into useful objects or hard cash. When I was younger I was always gardening with my mother at our home, where we grew apples strawberries and peas, and my mothers love of plants. When I was at university and had my first touch at being a big boy, I realised one evening after a discussion about mortgages and a few sherries, that the rat race wasnt for me and I wanted to be one of my horticultural heroes Hugh F W, even tho at 18 I was already folically challenged. And it was while watching a show of his, Connor and myself rather drunkenly decided that if he can do it then between the pair of us we could give it a shot, and filled the form in online there and then. I think as a team we both complement each other and both bring individual skills to the partnership. We are your typical odd couple (were not a couple, connor is happily married with a beautiful new born daughter, and I while happily single will never feel alone as I know my 23 twitter followers are there for me, thnks guys x). So thats about it, please feel free to email at any time with any questions and I will do my best to asnwer, post haste.

allotment blog