Overwintering and Wildlife

Autumn Blues

There’s no doubt about it there’s a nip in the air, and the media are scaring us with tales that the winter could be much worse than 2010. This means only one thing, time to tuck the plot in for the winter while trying to make it a haven for our wild animals. That snug feeling of being tucked up in your superman onesie in front of an open fire (chessnuts roasting obv), can feel even more content knowing you have done your bit for nature. If your cold and hungry imaging how that little robin at the end of your garden feels.

There are many activities you can undertake from the very simplest through to some that will take time and some expense. One of the simplest and most rewarding you can do is simply put feed out for birds. Whether you keep leftover bits of fat from bacon rinds, bread crumbs or go to the expense of purchasing seeds or mealworms you will greatly help out our feathered friends when food sources are scarce. It is also important to remember this much over looked fact, birds drink water ! And when there is snow on the ground or temperatures are below zero then this is not always easily accessible to them.

As the days started to gradually get colder and the growing season started to run out, we started to think about bugs and small animals. There is a great abundance of wildlife up at out allotment (with most of it living in my shed), we are blessed to have seen hares, grey squirrels, all of your common uk birds, frogs and we even arrived one day to chase a small flock of grey lag geese from our neighbours salad patch. We had planted some asian vegetables late end of summer and were unable to harvest it all. Our Choy sum had started to flower and was covered in bees and hover flies. As we weren’t going to have time to gain another crop from this space we decided that it would do the bees a world of good to have that extra source of food so we left it in the ground.

Choy Sum, Seeds

With little to no growing on our plot the focus has mainly turned into maintenaince and improving our structures. We gave the plot a good tidy 2 weeks ago and removed some of the rubbish that was accumulating in one of the corners. There was some offcuts of wood and various logs that were sodden and probbly no good for the fire but we didnt want to disturb them as it was probbly providing home to many wonderful beasts. It can happily sit there until next year when the weather starts to pick up and nature is back to its most energetic.

The simplest things we can do can mean the difference of survival or not for our wildlife.

Fitting a Water Butt To The Shed

Water is the most valuable resource on this planet. When summer comes round and our plants and vegetables are gasping for a drink, this is most likely the time when we’re being restricted from watering them by our local water company.

But it’s November…

Very true, but winter here is one of the wettest times and we aim to store up as much water as possible between now and next summer. Even in the driest areas of the UK, we could fill this water butt hundreds of times over, but it pays to plan well in advance. Something we’ve learnt from our first year on the allotment.

You can see from the photo, we’ve attached guttering to our “free from the internet shed”, this has two benefits. Firstly it’ll catch every drop of rain that hits out roof and secondly it’ll protect the sides of the shed from rain dripping down the side. Seeing as the shed needs all the help it can get to remain waterproof, this is a great benefit.

The water butt was from B&Q for around £50. To be fair it’s a bit of an extravagance, but we did some research on the benefits of using rain water over tap water and we came up with the following:

  1. Tap water may contain different chemicals such as chlorine and fluoride. Not conducive to organic veg
  2. Rain water has neutral ph levels
  3. Rain water is usually in abundance here in NI and we’ll be laughing mid summer.

Final say

Rain water is generally accepted as the best source of hydration for your veg, but across the board tap water seems to be an acceptable source by many experts and can be used throughout your allotment.

What’s your thoughts? Tap water or Rain water for your allotment?

Allotment Year One – Come Subscribe

Allotment Year One

Allotment Year One
Growblogs Plot

So its nearing the end of Allotment year one and we are loving it. I’m pretty sure it was a drunken joke followed by an email to the council. 8 years letter they returned the correspondence to say plot 8b was ours. It’s been our home from home for the last twelve months and it was a complete jungle before we got stuck in. Allotment Year One just like Romeo – Done !

I’d heard stories of people taking over allotments and being left with an almost ready to go plot. We weren’t so lucky and our first action was to dig up the entire plot and start to weed it. This was our first mistake. We soon realised the work involved and while we completed the first dig, it definitely seemed like the better option to use raised beds.

Now this project is not one we want to invest hugely into bar our time. Where we can source things frugally we will, where we can make something fit a purpose it may not have been intended for, we do. Where we can barter and trade….we will.

raised bed

Chris was able to salvage some floorboards from an old property and these became the basis of our raised beds. Speaking to some of the other allotment neighbours they advised filling the beds with a mix 50/50 mix and to date this has been our single biggest expense at £130. As you can see from the photo below, I may have made an error in my parking, placing the van where the soil was to go. The only way out was to shovel 2 tonne on my own. Cheers Chris.

allotment-blog

We’ve also sourced our “Free from the Internet” shed and have gotten it to be free standing and water tight, which has come in hand recently with the crazy rain of the past week.

After year 1 we’ve had some great successes and overall I’m extremely happy with what we have been able to grow. It’s also helped save on the cost of buying veg as well as ensuring we’re eating healthier. We’ve definitely eaten much more veg the past 12 months than ever before, which cannot be a bad thing.

I’ve honestly found the allotment to be a great stress reliever too. Horrible signal means that mobile data is a no go, so Facebook an twitter are out. Text and calls are possible. Barely.

I’m really looking forward to our second year on the allotment and hope we can share our experiences and mistakes. At least that way someone else will learn from them.

Drop us a message and let us know if we can help in any way.

Grow Your Own – Anyone can do it !

Grow Your Own.

grow your own
Our biggest raised bed

When I told my friends that we had acquired an allotment there was a great enthusiasm from them often followed by a comment along the lines of “id love to grow my own food but everything I touch dies” or “id love to but my garden is too small or I haven’t enough time”. Running an allotment is a big investment in time and money. So I would rarely advise to jump in, head first and take on a plot of land or turnover your wonderful lawn.

If you have a 30 acre field or a tiny windowsill which enjoys moderate sunlight, then there’s no excuse for not even giving it a go, try it, grow your own and be amazed at what you can do! (baring in mind I lived in a 1st floor flat for 3 years and grew salad crops and strawberries on my windowsills and mushrooms in my gas meter box). Were going to help guide you along the way, from growing the easiest of salad crops to some of the more challenging Mediterranean and Caribbean crops.

 

Allotments these days are considered as much a hipster must have as the top knot, squared glasses and well groomed beard (nothing wrong with a beard as long as you don’t buy it presents or decorate it for holidays). Everyone wants to live the good life, and its not surprising with the amount of television shows showcasing the wonders of grow your own and then the equally if not more abundant “cook your own” TV shows. Also with the ever popular occurrence of farmers markets and pop-up grocery shops, buying and consuming varieties and breeds of vegetables to produce every changing desirable characteristics of produce (e.g purple carrots, black kale etc..), for the true “Foodies” that we all know and love has never been as popular.

grow your own
Kholrabi

This year we are dedicating one of our largest raised bed to growing varieties of plants that we have never tried before. This is where we would like your help. What varieties would you like to see us grow or what varieties have you grown yourself and to what success? Is grow your own for you, lettuce know in the comments below.

Allotment Blog allert – Who are we ??

allotment blog
Growblogs Plot

 

 

Allotment Blog

Hello Im Chris and I say this on behalf of my good friend and allotment buddy Connor, Welcome to our blog !

“Another Allotment Blog !!!” I hear you scream at you devices of choice….. Well yeah but its not just any other allotment blog, its OUR allotment blog.

“Whats the difference between this allotment blog and any other allotment blog” You hark as the veins throb on your tempels” Well the simple answer is…. we’ve got a dinosaur on our logo.

Heres a bit about me. My name is Christopher (Chris, Ging) im 31 years old, my favourite colour is purple and fav animal is an elephant. I work in construction for my fathers building firm, tho I also run my own business as an energy advisor for the domestic housing market. Im a keen fisherman love the outdoors, and love the challenge of turning things I find into useful objects or hard cash. When I was younger I was always gardening with my mother at our home, where we grew apples strawberries and peas, and my mothers love of plants. When I was at university and had my first touch at being a big boy, I realised one evening after a discussion about mortgages and a few sherries, that the rat race wasnt for me and I wanted to be one of my horticultural heroes Hugh F W, even tho at 18 I was already folically challenged. And it was while watching a show of his, Connor and myself rather drunkenly decided that if he can do it then between the pair of us we could give it a shot, and filled the form in online there and then. I think as a team we both complement each other and both bring individual skills to the partnership. We are your typical odd couple (were not a couple, connor is happily married with a beautiful new born daughter, and I while happily single will never feel alone as I know my 23 twitter followers are there for me, thnks guys x). So thats about it, please feel free to email at any time with any questions and I will do my best to asnwer, post haste.

allotment blog